Research on the Environment

Good News

(source)  – UK’s first coal free day since the industrial revolution

April 21st 2017, for a whole 24 hours. No coal was burned to power the United Kingdom’s National Grid.

(source) Paris Climate Change Agreement

As of April 2017, 195 UNFCCC members have signed the treaty. These countries make up well over half of the world’s emission output. The Paris agreement, successor the Kyoto Protocols, aims to “stabilize greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system“.

(source) Arctic And Atlantic Protected From Drilling

The Obama administration removed the Arctic and Atlantic from five-year offshore gas and drilling plans. In December of 2016, President Obama and Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau banned drilling in 118.8 million acres of the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans. The Sierra Club explains that Obama utilized “a provision in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act that should make the withdrawal permanent.”

(source) Swedes recycle almost 100% of household waste

  • Sweden is almost there. More than 99 per cent of all household waste is recycled in one way or another.
  • 50 per cent of the household waste that is burnt to produce energy at incineration plants.
  • In 2014, Sweden even imported 2.7 million tonnes of waste from other countries.

(source) To tackle pollution, China to drop pursuit of growth at all costs

 Mon November 18, 2013

China will steer local governments away from the pursuit of economic growth at all costs and beef up their powers to punish polluters as part of a campaign to reverse the damage done by three decades of unchecked expansion.

(source) CO2 Emissions Flatline in 2014, Even as Global Economy Grows

 Sat March 14, 2015

A key stumbling block in the effort to combat global warming has been the intimate link between greenhouse gas emissions and economic growth. When times are good and industries are thriving, global energy use traditionally increases and energy-related carbon dioxide emissions also go up.

(source) 20 year old Dutch student devises method for removing plastic from the ocean.

  • 8 million tons of plastic enter the oceans every year
  • This passive system which will be deployed in full by 2020 will potentially clear half of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in 10 years

Bad News

(source) Arctic ice melt could trigger uncontrollable climate change at global level

  • Arctic scientists have warned that the increasingly rapid melting of the ice cap risks triggering 19 “tipping points” in the region that could have catastrophic consequences around the globe.
  • Temperatures in the Arctic are currently about 20C above what would be expected for the time of year,
  • (source) Since 1995, arctic ice covers have reduced by as much as 40%. At this rate, it’s estimated that Arctic regions will be without ice caps in the next few decades. Some scientists project that the Arctic will be ice-free by 2040.

(source) The world is warming and isn’t slowing down

  • For the next two decades, a warming of about 0.2°C per decade is projected
  • If current rates of emissions remain equal or increase this could increase by a further 0.1°C per decade

(source) We’re running out of Bees

15 June 2013 –  Things that require Bee pollination –  Here’s a short list: apples, onions, avocados, carrots, mangoes, lemons, limes, honeydew, cantaloupe, zucchini, summer squash, eggplant, cucumbers, green onions, cauliflower, leeks, bok choy, kale, broccoli, broccoli rabe, mustard greens.

(source) Sea Level Rise

  • According to Climate Central estimates, 150 million or more people are currently living on land that will either be submerged or exposed to chronic flooding by 2100.data graph

 

 

 

Advertisements

Author: David Rothwell

I am a Graphic Communication student at Cardiff Metropolitan School of Art and Design If you like any of my work, have feedback (good or bad) or would like to get in touch, please do

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s